Essay 3 – Haste Makes Waste

Hey everyone! Here’s another one of my old essays, please give me feedback in the comments. Thanks and enjoy!

Have you ever done something poorly because you wanted to get it over and done with and looked at it and realized that it wasn’t good? I certainly have. My essays turn out the worst if I don’t focus completely on what I’m doing. (But don’t worry – I’m not doing this half-heartedly). That’s why I agree with the statement haste makes waste.

In golf, if you want to win a tournament, you have to be sharp and focused. But there’s more to it than just getting the ball into the hole. You have to think about what club to use depending on how far away the hole is, and once you’re putting the ball in you have to think about slope. All of your moves are aimed at getting the ball into the hole, and if you make one silly mistake, it can mess up your game. I’ve noticed sometimes that some players play golf half-heartedly – it’s almost like they’re thinking about something else or being too under or overconfident. I think that at the Masters tournament today, Tiger Woods was good at the beginning and catching up to everyone, (like he usually does) but then at the 16th hole it almost felt as if he had low self-esteem – which might be why he ended with a score of -8. At the 17th and 18th holes he didn’t do very well either, probably because of the low self-esteem and the pressure. Then again, you have to take into account that he recently had a knee surgery, so he’s still recovering from that. But I think that if he had believed in himself and taken a little while longer to concentrate on some of his shots, (especially the shot that went far off the green at the 17th hole) he might have been closer to winning. That’s why it’s better to slow it down and think it through, and to take it one step at a time. After all, you only have one shot at winning the Masters every year, so why not make it your best?

I can definitely relate the phrase haste makes waste to homework. Sometimes, you just really don’t feel like doing it. (Actually, I’m sure that everyone who has been through school has experienced that at one time or another). If it’s a beautiful day outside, you want to go and play sports and relax rather than doing more schoolwork – when you’ve already had a long and tiring day at school. So you sit with a pencil, your math textbook, and graph paper and hastily scribble down some answers about angle bisectors. When you check your answers at the back after you’re done, if you did it hastily while thinking about playing outside, chances are that most of them were wrong. This goes to show that even if you know about angle bisectors (or whatever it is you were doing) you were doing it half-heartedly. In my opinion, you might as well have not been doing it because it was a waste. Think about everything that you have to do as only having one chance to make it right – if you focus on it and put your all into it, then you’ve given it your best shot, and in the end, that’s what counts. So, try not to be hasty about things that you have to do, (like homework) because the more you focus on it and get it done quickly, chances are you’ll be soaking up the sun outside in no time.

In conclusion, I think that doing something well has a lot to do with focusing. No matter what you’re doing – writing an essay, playing golf or solving math problems – all of them involve concentrating. The more you go through life, the more you’ll learn that doing it well and quickly is better than doing it quickly and not doing it well. So, slow down – think it through and check for mistakes, because chances are you’ll finish it with fewer mistakes if you take your time. In a test, you only have one chance – in golf tournaments, you only have one chance – so live in the moment and turn that one chance into something spectacular.

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